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May 2017


THIS MONTH : LATEST DATELINE STORYBOARD: Beachlands


LATEST ON THE TIMELINE : From Bridge Farm to Westham, the untold story of Pevensey School

MB__homeSTORYBOARD HOMEPAGE


Twentieth Century: Dateline 1935: Beachlands


Beachlands, The Avenue leading to the sea

ADVERTISEMENT TEXT :
MARINE AVENUE BEACHLANDS
Sussex Agricultural Express – 9 August 1935
All the Bungalows except 3 have now been sold in this delightful Avenue leading to the Sea. Other attractive roads and closes are being laid where Bungalows can be had from £395 to £1000 and Houses from £669 to £1250. Term of purchase arranged. Full particulars from ANDERIDA LTD., Estate Agents, PEVENSEY BAY, Telephone: 331
Image: Johnston Press plc. Image created courtesy THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD
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Beachlands, freehold bungalows

ADVERTISEMENT TEXT :
BEACHLANDS PEVENSEY BAY
Beachlands Estate advertisement, Sussex Agricultural Express: 6 August 1954
Illustrated are semi-detached bungalows of Swedish design which are being erected at Beachlands, Pevensey. The accommodation comprises living room 16ft x 11ft 6ins, two bedrooms 12ft 6ins x 11ft 6ins and 9ft x 8ft 9ins, respectively, Kitchen 8ft 9ins x 7ft 6ins (measurements are approximate), bathroom containing bath, lavatory basin (hot and cold water) and w.c. Electricity, Gas , Water and Main Drainage to all properties. The low price of £1,495 freehold is made possible because the roads and sewers were laid before the war: the price is based upon the current cost of labour and materials. Mortgages of £1,000 to approved applicants. repayments 31s weekly.

Also available houses by the sea at £2,000 freehold, Mortgages to approved applicants

Image, Johnston Press plc. Image created courtesy of THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.
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Quotes: There are two principle types

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There are two principle types, although the catalogue produced at the time listed numerous varieties. The most basic design – known locally as “oyster bungalows” have a large curved section at the front, forming the main room with windows all round and a French window style double front door. The second type is a more boxy structure with a flat roof and typical ‘thirties’ style windows, with horizontal glazing bars.
Steven Braggs, Sun, Sea and Sand: The Great British Seaside Holiday

Take a walk around these houses, breathe in the sea air, relax – take your socks off, you’ll never leave.
Stephen Marland, Seaside moderne

Book

Sun, Sea and Sand:  The Great British Seaside Holiday
Seaside Architecture
The architecture of what became known as the “modern movement”, was based on the principle that “form follows function”, that the outward appearance of the building should be determined solely by the intended use of its interior. This doctrine was publicized in Europe by amongst others the architect Le Corbusier and Head of the Bauhaus School of Art and Design, Walter Gropius. The majority of true modern buildings in the ‘twenties and ‘thirties had similar outward characteristics: flat roofs; the use of white concrete; strong geometrical shapes, particularly the cube; the use of cantilevered balconies; large expanses of glass and above all, an almost complete absence of any ornamentation.

Probably the finest example of a modern seaside building is the De La Warr Pavilion at Bexhill-on-Sea.

One site of particular interest is to be found at Pevensey Bay in Sussex. A development was built there in the later ‘thirties based on Swedish designs. There are two principle types, although the catalogue produced at the time listed numerous varieties. The most basic design – known locally as “oyster bungalows” have a large curved section at the front, forming the main room with windows all round and a French window style double front door. The second type is a more boxy structure with a flat roof and typical ‘thirties’ style windows, with horizontal glazing bars. The original development was to have had shops and a cinema. Sadly, the War intervened and the cinema was never built, although development was continued after the War.

Blogs

Stephen Marland, the Beachlands Blog: Breathe in the sea air, relax – take your socks off, you’ll never leave
“it’s a place I love, the air and my soul changes whenever I visit. I live in Manchester and cycle the south coast for fun and photography, can’t wait to return—Stephen Marland, Seaside moderne, December 2015

RETURNING TO Pevensey Bay by bike in search of an old friend, Beachlands Estate, a mini maze of homes developed between 1937 and the 1960s. Predominantly bungalows, simple brick and concrete construction, linked by laid concrete roads, bordered by grass verges. Once the province of East End migrants, happily escaping the City’s pull, now the playground of a newer Beachlanded gentry. Over time they have been remade and remodelled in the owners image, no two are the same, few retain the original clean flat roofed lines and slim, elegant window frames. This is the land of salty uPVC pragmatism, enlarged hydrangea, wishing well, wobbly picket, forecourt four by four, and lightly tilted windmill. It’s easy to become disorientated here, service vehicles enter, soon stopping to ask the residents:

“Where are we?”

We are in an informal land of endless summers, slower time. The seaside refuses to behave, a mild sense of anarchy prevails. Take a walk around these houses, breathe in the sea air, relax – take your socks off, you’ll never leave.


Blogger, Anne Ward, Glasgow
Visit, April 2009

I ran out of steam writing about day 4, but there’s one last thing. A trip to Beachlands, a 1930s bungalow estate in Pevensey Bay between Eastbourne and Bexhill. Following a spectacular line of “oyster” bungalows, the estate opens up into little houses of various shapes and sizes. Most were built in the 1930s so there’s a bit of streamline moderne going on, and some straight Art Deco.
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According to Sun, sea and sand: the great British seaside holiday (don’t leave home without it), the estate was intended to have shops and a cinema, but the war started and the plans fell through. I’ve been admiring these sort of houses in Moxette’s flickrstream for so long that it was a real treat to see so many at once. Thanks to Chris for the tip-off – gratefully received as we wouldn’t have found it otherwise.

Beachlands Estate
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One site of particular interest is to be found at Pevensey Bay in Sussex. A development was built there in the later ‘thirties based on Swedish designs

Sun, Sea and Sand: The Great British Seaside Holiday
By Steven Braggs and Diane Harris

The inter-war period saw the annual holiday become part of the lives of large numbers of people. This book explores the facets of seaside holiday – where people went, and why; how they got there; where they stayed; what they did; and what they wore. It also examines the architecture of pleasure, in the form of cinemas, piers, lidos and pavilions.

Steven Braggs and Diane Harris are a husband and wife team who are experts on popular culture of the twentieth century in Britain and run a number of websites dedicated to their specialist interests.
find out more about the book
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5110PZETVXL

IMAGE CREDIT: Stephen Marland, Seaside moderne, December 2015